Categories
Multiple Myeloma Treatment

Elotuzumab Multiple Myeloma

Spread the love

Empliciti is the brand name for elotuzumab. (*Adds elotuzumab and empliciti to autocorrect dictionary*) I will be using elotuzumab and Empliciti interchangeably so that I can focus on facts and not what elotuzumab is called.

I will be taking elotuzumab soon, so it is time to review elotuzumab and look at potential elotuzumab side effects and dosing for multiple myeloma treatment.

Why Elotuzumab or Empliciti

As I understand the term, my current multiple myeloma status is MRD negative. The short-short version is that there is no MRD detected anywhere in my body, even by a test so sensitive that it can detect just one cancer cell among one-million cells. This is good news.

In all of my tests since they changed my patient status last fall to multiple myeloma in remission, my myeloma markers all come back negative, or in the green (normal) range. This is also good.

But, in every monthly meeting with my oncologist, as he stares intensely at the screen with my numbers on it, he fidgets terribly with his fingers as he reads off the good news. He is nervous.

And when he is nervous, I’m nervous.

I’m still in remission and my tests all still say zero, so we’ve been working on my other health issues. I’ve stopped taking the powerful antifungal, posaconazole. My blood pressure is finally coming down from ridiculous highs.

Check out my Stash vs Acorns and more review.

My hemoglobin shows me as anemic, but just barely so. This has been the big concern. Anything my oncologist can give me will lower my blood counts, so having normal, stable, healthy blood counts first is ideal.

So we wait.

But, he’s nervous.

Elotuzumab Maintenance for Multiple Myeloma

So, the issue is that while my myeloma is zero now, it can explode back to very-not-zero in a short period of time. The way to avoid this is with some maintenance chemotherapy.

The idea is that if a cancer cell does try and start something, there will already be chemicals in my body ready to kick it in the teeth before it can even get started, instead of it getting a running head start in between monthly (or longer) monitoring.

Enter elotuzumab.

The similarity in the elotuzumab and daratumumab names is not a coincidence. The drugs are related, but not the same.

As my doc explains it, elotuzumab is a relatively benign chemotherapy that does a great job at keeping myeloma from increasing, but a bad job at lowering myeloma counts. Since I’m already zero, stability is good.

We didn’t start it today, but it is coming next month. He gave me what he called, “a bunch of medical marketing material.”

I like my oncologist. 🙂

elotuzumab information dosing side effects and package insert
Elotuzumab package insert and marketing material

Why Elotuzumab?

I need to understand my myeloma treatments and the chemo they are giving me, including why I take elotuzumab for multiple myeloma maintenance.

The short answer is that daratumumab didn’t work for me, or rather it worked too well, taking out my immune systems along with myeloma. Daratumumab is the darling of the multiple myeloma treatment world. Papers are starting to call for daratumumab to be a first-line treatment, adding it to the standard Revlimid, Velcade, dexamethazone treatment regime. Elotuzumab is the red-headed stepchild of daratumumab.

Elotuzumab Dosing

According to the elotuzumab package insert and brochures I received, elotuzumab dosing usually involves dexamethasone and either Revlimid (lenalidomide) or Pomalyst (pomalidomide). My oncologist says we’ll be adding Pomalyst.

So Empliciti dosing is done by infusion, whereas Pomalyst and dexamethasone are taken as pills.

How Does Elotuzumab Work?

According to the medical marketing material supplied by Empliciti’s manufacturer, Emplicity helps mark, or identify myeloma cells making them easier to find. Then, it activates NK cells (Natural Killer cells) which attach and destroy multiple myeloma cells.

Sounds good, but apparently it doesn’t work at well as daratumumab. Maybe, in my situation that doesn’t matter since I’m starting at MRD negative. All I need is to make sure it doesn’t come back. I don’t need it to root it out.

Elotuzumab Side Effects

Like all chemotherapies, Empliciti can cause other cancers. There really isn’t anything you can do about that if you are taking chemo.

Other side effects include liver problems, fever, rashes, trouble breathing (fun!), dizziness, light-headedness, and as always, infections.

I’m already familiar with the dexamethasone side effects. I guess it depends on the dose. I tolerate the smaller doses pretty well.

I will have to look up Pomalyst since I have never taken it before.

As always, we’ll hope for the best.

Elotuzumab Schedule

The schedule for Empliciti dosing looks familiar to my old Revlimid schedule, with a 28-day cycle.

For the first two months, you take elotuzumab once a week via IV infusion. You take dexamethasone every 7 days, on the same day you get your empliciti infusion. You take pomalyst every day. Starting on day 23, you stop taking everything (no dex or pomalyst) until the next infusion. Basically, a one-week off period.

After the first two cycles, it goes monthly. You get the elotuzumab infusion on Day 1 and take dexamethasone on Day 1 and then every 7 days. You take Pomalyst every day, stopping on Day 23, and taking a week off from all meds until the next cycle where you repeat the same dose schedule.

About the Author

Brian Nelson is an expert on multiple myeloma via first-hand knowledge as a patient but is not a doctor. Brian was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2019. He has been living with it ever since. All information is for informational purposes only and is not medical advice. Check with your own doctor about your specific situation for medical advice.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *