Categories
Living with Myeloma

Pregabalin for Neuropathy

When I got blasted with melphalan last year as part of my autologous stem cell transplant (SCT), it chewed up the nerves in my feet leaving me with some pretty substantial neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

You can find the official medical definition of peripheral neuropathy here. For, those of us with multiple myeloma, neuropathy is a pain and numbness, usually in the fingers and feet. It is caused by the chemotherapy drugs.

Velcade side-effects caused neuropathy in my fingers until my hands hurt so bad I told them to take me off it, and figure something else out. (This is why I switched doctors. You shouldn’t have to beg for your own quality of life.) It left me my feet mostly alone.

My fingers are largely better now. There is no pain, but there is a numbness or missing nerve sensation that makes things like separating two book pages, or counting out cards, or money difficult. I have to really focus, and rely on my sight as well.

pregabalin neuropathy pain

Neuropathy in Feet with Myeloma

These days, nearly a year after my SCT, my real difficulty is the neuropathy in my feet. I started, like so many patients with gabapentin. It seemed to work for a while, but the dose went up and up, until it wasn’t really working.

My current doc considers quality of life actually suggested medical marijuana and/or CBD. I need to look into that. In the meantime, I wanted the ease of a prescription.

He set me up with pregabalin. I haven’t had any pregabalin side-effects, which is very nice.

Pregabalin for Neuropathy Pain

Here we go with the sucky US healthcare system again. It’s a shame that Republicans can’t fight over how to make healthcare better, instead of just tearing down anything Democrats made. You don’t like Obamacare? Fine. Make something else, but quit pretending the nonsensical system we have in place doesn’t need any fixing.

You see pregabalin costs a lot of money of money because there is no generic version yet. It is sold under the brand name of Lyrica.

Fortunately, for me, I have pretty great insurance. It will cover Lyrica with some sort of deductible, and some sort of co-pay. As a cancer patient, those numbers are meaningless to me. I blew past my out-of-pocket-maximum in just days. All that matters to me are coverage limits.

In this case, my insurance will only cover 300 mg per day. I really need 400 mg per day to make my feet manageable. (Don’t get me wrong. This doesn’t bring my feet anywhere near to normal, but I can ignore the nerve issues… unless I step on something.)

Doctor versus Insurance Company

One of the reasons you want to have a good doctor who really considers patient care the most important thing they do, is because in situations like this, the only hope I have is for my doctor to do some sort of battle of words with my insurance company to get them to cover the 400 mg.

If he loses, I’ll make do with 300 mg and maybe see if I can get a double prescription for nortriptyline, which I have a prescription for, but it’s for bedtime. Supposedly, a side-effect of nortriptyline is that it makes people very drowsy. It doesn’t necessarily have that effect on me, so rolling out of bed with that, and then, doing the 300 mg pregabalin might just do.

That, plus always wearing shoes…

Categories
Multiple Myeloma Treatment

Myeloma Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy generally starts out pretty well for a lot of myeloma patients, depending on where they were in the course of the disease when they got diagnosed. For weeks, friends and family remarked on how well I looked. It seemed like nothing had changed.

It turns out that the various myeloma chemotherapy drugs all have huge possible side effects. That isn’t surprising considering chemotherapy is essentially a big word for targeted poisoning. Its’s just that they can take a while to build up. You see, if you lose 20,000 healthy stem cells, your body has more. But, if you lose another 20,000 the next month… and the next… well you get the idea.

healthy cells chemo
Hello, little cells… the chemo drugs are here… AGGGHHHH!!!

All chemo drugs are poisons. They kill both healthy cells and cancer cells. In general, they target fast dividing cells. Cancer cells divide very quickly, but so do a lot of important cells in your body. The hope is that the drugs kill cancer cells faster than healthy cells, thereby giving a net win to the body overall.

Chemotherapy For Myeloma

For multiple myeloma, the front line of chemo usually consists of dexamethasone, velcade, and revalimid. There are many variations depending upon the patients circumstances and things like allergies and other reactions, but my oncologist calls this combination the peanut butter and jelly of myeloma treatment.

Dexamethasone and Myeloma

Dexamethasone is a cheap steroid that has been around for years. It is usually administered in small doses. The biggest size pill is 4 mg. For multiple myeloma patients, the dose is 20 mg. That’s five of the highest dose they make. If people actually took this dose, they’d make a larger pill. I take it on a sort of bizarre schedule of on two days, off one day, on two days, off the weekend. Either way, that’s a crap ton of dexamethasone.

Wondering about Credit Karma?

When you take a lot of steroids, it gives you energy and power. It also keeps you awake. I take the first dose and spend the night with very little sleep and very little tiredness. I am invincible!

But, when the steroids leave your body, it causes a terrible energy crash. Think chugging Red Bull and eating sugar all night and then the crash that comes after and multiply it by 10. This is where they start giving you medicines to fix the problems caused by the medicines they gave you before. Many patients get some form of sleeping pill that helps, but cannot overpower the second day of taking dexamethasone in a row.

Velcade and Myeloma

Next up is velcade. I’m not sure what dose of velcade I get. It is an injectiom that I go into the clinic for. They draw my blood. Then, we wait until the results show up saying that it is okay to give me the velcade without triggering a major medical event, or outright killing me.

I got a really nice talk from the “financial counselor” at the clinic about the bills I would be getting. Fortunately, I’m lucky enough to have good insurance. As near as I can tell, it is $4,000 per shot… I go in twice a week. I hit my out of pocket maximum the first week. It just takes a while for all the computers to update.

Velcade causes neuropathy. My fingers hurt. The tips are less sensitive. It’s not that I can’t feel them, it’s that they seem a tiny bit numb, like if they were minorly burned. I can touch stuff and type, but I have trouble being able to tell if there is one piece of paper or two. I can’t really feel the distinction. If there are two pages, I have trouble putting my fingers in the right place to separate them.

You should be starting to get an idea about how these drugs are not subtle.

Revlimid for Myeloma

Finally, revlimid is a relative of the drug thalidomide. Yes, that thalidomide. For those of you too young to be in on the “joke” thalidomide was a drug given to pregnant women in the 1960s to help with morning sickness, insomnia, and other stuff. The punch line? It can cause major birth defects.

So, what am I doing taking a version of this drug in 2019? Killing cancer cells.

I take the 25 mg tablets. I guess after my stem cell transplant I will take 10 mg tablets as part of maintenance mode, so I guess 25 mg is a lot. I take it on weekdays for three weeks, then I take a week off. I’m not 100% what this does. Maybe the idea is that if I stop poisoning myself for a week some of the healthy cells will come back before I die.

In order to get revlimid I have to answer a series of questions both with a pharmacist, and with a representative of the company that makes it. All of which are recorded. Essentially, I have to say that I’m using birth control (if sexually active with a woman with a “functioning uterus”). That I won’t share my medication, and that other people shouldn’t touch it. In other words, if a baby shows up with birth defects around me, and I try to sue, they have dozens of recordings of me saying it’s my own fault because I knew better.

As a man, I get off easy. Women have to take a pregnancy test each month.

Oh, and by the way, it costs $10,000+ for each month’s supply.

Myeloma Chemo vs Other Cancers

It turns out that I don’t know very much about cancer in general. Taking pills and shots while walking around doesn’t seem like the chemotherapy I see in movies and on TV shows. I guess I get the more typical chemotherapy experience in a few months when I do the stem cell transplant and they kill my immune system (stronger poison for better health!) and I spend a few weeks in the hospital.

I could be worse. I could have pancreatic cancer. As far as I can tell that’s the worst one. I’ll do more research when me and my dexamethasone can’t sleep.